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HerGrammy
Fryer


Reged: 11/21/04
Posts: 4
Ground beef is rubbery
      #5149 - 11/21/04 05:06 PM

I've been cooking for almost forty years - (that's probably the problem, I am burnt out.) Anyway, lately my old recipes don't seem to come out the same. For example, the chili I made yesterday with 85% ground beef - the beef (crumbled) was so rubbery. What am I doing? I browned it slowly and drained it and added it to the usual recipe. Any suggestions would be appreciated, thanks.

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VegasDramaQueen
Sous Chef


Reged: 04/14/04
Posts: 265
Loc: Las Vegas, Nevada
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11195 - 11/22/04 11:49 AM

I discovered something a long time ago that I'd like to pass on to you. Ground beef is just that - ground beef. It doesn't necessarily mean that you're getting ground steak, or ground pot roast, etc. You could be getting any combination of ground meat from the steer, (or cow for that matter). Beef legally means any part of the animal. It's possible that if you're buying very cheap ground beef that you could be getting some rubbery, tough part of the steer. Buy from a reputable butcher or supermarket. Or better yet, do what I do, buy a grinder and grind your own. Not only is is much safer, but you know what you're getting. The ratio of 15% fat to 85% lean is a good one.

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Gloria2b
Chef de partie


Reged: 03/26/02
Posts: 178
Loc: Corpus Christi, Texas
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11196 - 11/22/04 02:36 PM

I have to say I agree with VegasDramaQueen!!!

Unless the ground beef you buy states ground chuck, sirloin, etc there is no way to know what it is or how it will taste.

Locally, a new meat market opened and they sell black angus meat...really good... plus we also grind our own... much better that way.

Also, for us we use very lean meats including ground because of my ongoing... will not go away health problems.

By the way... aahheemmmm... I have been cooking for as long as you... and still like it... I just need to try new things now and again...! Plus learning from others and the enormous resources for cooks now really helps.

Here is to a better cut of meat leading to better flavor for you next time!

Take care and happy cooking,
Gloria


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HerGrammy
Fryer


Reged: 11/21/04
Posts: 4
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11197 - 11/22/04 06:03 PM

Thanks for your responses.

The package stated ground chuck and I bought it at WalMart. I think I'll take your advice and try grinding my own. Otherwise, it seems that the quality is inconsistent.

What cut of meat do you buy to grind (chuck roast?)and how do you estimate the % of fat - just by eye?


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cheryl long
Griller


Reged: 03/23/04
Posts: 40
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11198 - 11/22/04 10:13 PM

hi ,
well have to say there gyes are right.
i used to buy from a local grocery store.
and everytime it would come out rubbery,
well i started to get my meet from a place that fresh grounds it as ordered and it's much better.
when you cook it up it will be real fine and tender.
fresh ground it the best.
cheryl


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HerGrammy
Fryer


Reged: 11/21/04
Posts: 4
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11199 - 12/13/04 06:39 AM

Just a little update . . . I have been grinding meat from chuck roasts with good success. The only problem I had was grinding a piece of round - it was a little dry in a burger. It is well worth it to take the time to do it. Thanks for the suggestions.

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Gloria2b
Chef de partie


Reged: 03/26/02
Posts: 178
Loc: Corpus Christi, Texas
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11200 - 12/13/04 12:05 PM

I know good food is always appreciated! I feel like I run a restuarant here... And it is just "My Kitchen!" I am glad you found a new helper in the kitchen... I know I always appreciated new knowledge... that is why I have a library of cookbooks and magazines... I always mangage to learn something new in each one... I would rather think of it as learning than an addiction to cooking... but either way... a good way to pass time..
Happy Cooking!
Gloria


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VegasDramaQueen
Sous Chef


Reged: 04/14/04
Posts: 265
Loc: Las Vegas, Nevada
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11201 - 12/15/04 09:43 AM

HER GRAMMY: Round steak has almost no fat at all so it will grind up drier than most other cuts. If you like the quality of round steak, or you get a good price on it, add a little beef suet to the meat as you grind it. You can get this in your grocers meat section or ask for it, they'll be glad to give it to you probably for free. This is what I do and it works out well because I can control the amount of fat that goes into my ground beef.

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HerGrammy
Fryer


Reged: 11/21/04
Posts: 4
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11202 - 12/16/04 06:23 AM

Ahah! Beef suet, huh? I will certainly do that.

Since you mentioned it - I have been using bacon grease and lard mixed with birdseed/meal/etc. for my bird feeder. It would probably be better to use the beef suet. How does it come in a hunk, like salt pork? I have lots of red-headed woodpeckers which we enjoy very much.


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VegasDramaQueen
Sous Chef


Reged: 04/14/04
Posts: 265
Loc: Las Vegas, Nevada
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11203 - 12/16/04 12:23 PM

Yes it comes in a hunk, usually in the section of the meat counter that has the "unusual" things like shank bones, pork hocks, etc. If you can't find it then ask the meat manager for it. They usually throw it out after trimming the meat. Make sure it's solid suet. You can cut off pieces from the hunk and freeze it for further use in your ground beef, or get a ton of it, render sime of it down and add birdseed then pour the melted suet mixture into whatever molds you want to use. Lay some butcher's twine into the mold leaving enough hanging out to form a "hanger" for the suet. The birds love it and it provides fat to keep them warm. You have the right idea.

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chefette
Fryer


Reged: 12/16/04
Posts: 1
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11204 - 12/16/04 05:37 PM

I just signed up...we have two markets in town which sell great ground meat. Went to a friend's who grinds their own and it is absolutely is better than store-bought.
I called the market asking the difference between lard and suet. Lard is rendered suet. So you can use lard in pastry, but not suet. I've been cooking 40 years too and loved it then and love it more now!


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VegasDramaQueen
Sous Chef


Reged: 04/14/04
Posts: 265
Loc: Las Vegas, Nevada
Re: Ground beef is rubbery
      #11205 - 12/17/04 12:20 PM

Yep, lard is suet that has been rendered. If you want fantastic pie crust, lard is the way to go. Because it's an animal product it has cholesterol and saturated fat, unlike Crisco. But if you've ever had a pasty, those great little meat and veggie pies so popular in England and northern Michigan, made with suet, you would never use Crisco again. Suet - lard - makes the flakiest, richest pie crust ever. By the way, I watched Alton Brown ("Good Eats") this morning and he did a show on ground beef. He said the same thing, that grinding your own is far better than store bought. Catch this repeat on the Food TV network if you can.

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